[buug] BUUG list policy?

Rick Moen rick at linuxmafia.com
Mon Dec 31 19:57:31 PST 2012


Quoting Michael Paoli (Michael.Paoli at cal.berkeley.edu):

> --DRAFT--DRAFT--DRAFT--DRAFT--DRAFT--DRAFT--DRAFT--DRAFT--DRAFT--DRAFT--
> Mailing list for the
> <A HREF="http://www.buug.org/">Berkeley Unix User group (BUUG)</A>.
> 
> An open forum for all things related to Unix.
> 
> Note: Unsolicited commercial E-mail is not allowed.
> Job postings?  Only if you're intimately familiar with the position, as
> in you are the hiring manager and would be direct supervisor for the
> position, or it's a close peer position you very regularly do or would
> work with and are highly familiar with the position.  Recruiter/agency
> doesn't qualify as "intimately familiar", nor does being in HR for the
> employer.
> Be nice, don't be annoying.
> When in doubt, ask first (on the list).
> 
> To see the collection of prior postings to the list, visit the
> <A HREF="http://buug.org/pipermail/buug/">BUUG Archives</A>.
> --DRAFT--DRAFT--DRAFT--DRAFT--DRAFT--DRAFT--DRAFT--DRAFT--DRAFT--DRAFT--

1.  As usual, this is a bit overengineered.
2.  Relatively short as it is, sadly, it's longer than people will 
    read and heed.
3.  To the extent people read policies at all, shorter wording makes 
    them more likely to be taken seriously.  In particular, the 
    draft's item about job postings practically begs readers to 
    assume it somehow doesn't apply to them.  

You should consider what the purpose of the policy wording is.  (There
are multiple possibilities.)

FWIW, recruiters are, God love 'em, statistically the least likely
people on the planet to pay attention to job-posting policies.
Especially convoluted ones.

I note: 

> When in doubt, ask first (on the list).

The people who most need to pay attention to that are by definition the
very least likely to.  So, you're basically reaching _already_ polite and
thoughtful people to tell them 'Oh, by the way, please be polite and
thoughtful.'

> Note: Unsolicited commercial E-mail is not allowed.

Oh, _that's_ super useful.  I'm sure the spammers will be impressed,
because, y'know, they never send it where it's unwanted.  (In this
context, the phrase 'no allowed' basically is devoid of meaning.)



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